POLITICA


Alăturați-vă forumului, este rapid și ușor

POLITICA
POLITICA
Vrei să reacționezi la acest mesaj? Creați un cont în câteva clicuri sau conectați-vă pentru a continua.
Căutare
 
 

Rezultate pe:
 


Rechercher Cautare avansata

Navigare
 Portal
 Index
 Membri
 Profil
 FAQ
 Cautare
Navigare
 Portal
 Index
 Membri
 Profil
 FAQ
 Cautare

Ce linie a trecut Putin în Crimeea?

In jos

Ce linie a trecut Putin în Crimeea? Empty Ce linie a trecut Putin în Crimeea?

Mesaj Scris de CHINEZ cumpar PECHINEZ Dum Mar 30, 2014 7:08 pm

[The Internationalist column published in the The Boston Globe Ideas.]

WHAT HAPPENED IN UKRAINE over the past month left even veteran policy-watchers shaking their heads. One day, citizens were serving tea to the heroic demonstrators in Kiev’s Euromaidan, united against an authoritarian president. Almost the next, anonymous special forces fighters in balaclavas were swarming Crimea, answering to no known leader or government, while Europe and the United States grasped in vain for ways to influence events.

Within days, the population of Crimea had voted in a hastily organized referendum to join Russia, and Russia’s president, Vladimir Putin, had signed the annexation treaty formally absorbing the strategic peninsula into his nation.

As the dust settles, Western leaders have had to come to terms not only with a new division of Ukraine, but its unsettling implications for how the world works. Part of the shock is in Putin’s tactics, which blended an old-fashioned invasion with some degree of democratic process within the region, and added a dollop of modern insurgent strategies for good measure.
Vladimir Putin at the Plesetsk cosmodrome launch site in northern Russia.

Vladimir Putin at the Plesetsk cosmodrome launch site in northern Russia./PRESIDENTIAL PRESS SERVICE VIA REUTERS



But when policy specialists look at the results, they see a starker turning point. Putin’s annexation of the Crimea is a break in the order that America and its allies have come to rely on since the end of the Cold War—namely, one in which major powers only intervene militarily when they have an international consensus on their side, or failing that, when they’re not crossing a rival power’s red lines. It is a balance that has kept the world free of confrontations between its most powerful militaries, and which has, in particular, given the United States, as the most powerful superpower of all, an unusually wide range of motion in the world. As it crumbles, it has left policymakers scrambling to figure out both how to respond, and just how far an emboldened Russia might go.

***

“WE LIVE IN A DIFFERENT WORLD than we did less than a month ago,” NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen said in March. Ukraine could witness more fighting, he warned; the conflict could also spread to other countries on Russia’s borders.

Up until the Crimea crisis began, the world we lived in looked more predictable. The fall of the Berlin Wall a quarter century ago ushered in an era of international comity and institution building not seen since the birth of the United Nations in 1945. International trade agreements proliferated at a dizzying speed. NATO quickly expanded into the heart of the former Soviet bloc, and lawyers designed an International Criminal Court to punish war crimes and constrain state interests.

Only small-to-middling powers like Iran, Israel, and North Korea ignored the conventions of the age of integration and humanitarianism—and their actions only had regional impact, never posing a global strategic threat. The largest powers—the United States, Russia, and China—abided by what amounted to an international gentleman’s agreement not to use their military for direct territorial gains or to meddle in a rival’s immediate sphere of influence. European powers, through NATO, adopted a defensive crouch. The United States, as the world’s dominant military and economic power, maintained the most freedom to act unilaterally, as long as it steered clear of confrontation with Russia or China. It carefully sought international support for its military interventions, even building a “Coalition of the Willing” for its 2003 invasion of Iraq, which was not approved by the United Nations. The Iraq war grated at other world powers that couldn’t embark on military adventures of their own; but despite the irritation the United States provoked, American policymakers and strategists felt confident that the United States was obeying the unspoken rules.

If the world community has seemed bewildered by how to respond to Putin’s moves in Crimea over the last month, it’s because Russia has so abruptly interrupted this narrative. Using Russia’s incontestable military might, with the backing of Ukrainians in a subset of that country, he took over a chunk of territory featuring the valuable warm-water port of Sevastopol. The boldness of this move left behind the sanctions and other delicate moves that have become established as persuasive tactics. Suddenly, it seemed, there was no way to halt Russia without outright war.

Some analysts say that Putin appears to have identified a loophole in the post-Cold War world. The sole superpower, the United States, likes to put problems in neat, separate categories that can be dealt with by the military, by police action or by international institutions. When a problem blurs those boundaries—pirates on the high seas, drug cartels with submarines and military-grade weapons—Western governments don’t know what to do. Today, international norms and institutions aren’t configured to react quickly to a legitimate great power willing to use force to get what it wants.

“We have these paradigms in the West about what’s considered policing, and what’s considered warfare, and Putin is riding right up the middle of that,” said Janine Davidson, a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations and former US Air Force officer who believes that Putin’s actions will force the United States to update its approach to modern warfare. “What he’s doing is very clever.”

For obvious reasons, a central concern is how Putin might make use of his Crimean playbook next. He could, for example, try to engineer an ethnic provocation, or a supposedly spontaneous uprising, in any of the near-Russian republics that threatens to ally too closely with the West. Mark Kramer, director of Harvard University’s Project on Cold War Studies, said that Putin has “enunciated his own doctrine of preemptive intervention on behalf of Russian communities in neighboring countries.”

There have been intimations of this approach before. In 2008, Russian infantry pushed into two enclaves in neighboring Georgia, citing claims—which later proved false—that thousands of ethnic Russians were being massacred. Russia quickly routed the Georgian military and took over Abkhazia and South Ossetia. Today the disputed enclaves hover in a sort of twilight zone; they’ve declared independence but were recognized only by Moscow and a few of its allies. Ever since then, Georgian politicians have warned that Russia might do the same thing again: The country could seize a land corridor to Armenia, or try to absorb Moldova, the rest of Ukraine, or even the Baltic States, the only former Soviet Republics to join both NATO and the European Union.

Others see Putin’s reach as limited at best to places where meaningful military resistance is absent and state control weak. Even in Ukraine, Russia experts say, Putin seemed content to wield influence through friendly leaders until protests ran the Ukrainian president out of town and left a power vacuum that alarmed Moscow. Graham, the former Bush administration official, said it would be a long shot for Putin to move his military into other republics: There are few places with Crimea’s combination of an ethnic Russian enclave, an absence of state authority, and little risk of Western intervention.

The larger worry, of course, is who else might want to follow Russia’s example. China is the clearest concern, and from time to time has shown signs of trying to throw its weight around its region, especially in disputed areas of the South China Sea. But so far it has been Chinese fishing boats and coast guard vessels harassing foreign fishermen, with the Chinese navy carefully staying away in order not to trigger a military response. For the moment, at least, Putin seems willing to upend this delicately balanced world order on his own.

***

THE INTERNATIONAL community’s flat-footed response in Crimea raises clear questions: What should the United States and its allies do if this kind of land grab happens again—and is there a way to prevent such moves in the first place?

“This is a new period that calls for a new strategy,” said Michael A. McFaul, who stepped down as US ambassador to Russia a few weeks before the Crimea crisis. “Putin has made it clear that he doesn’t care what the West thinks.”

So far the international response has entailed soft power pressure that is designed to have an effect over the long term. The United States and some European governments have instated limited economic sanctions targeting some of Putin’s close advisers, and Russia has been kicked out of the G-8. There’s talk of reinvigorating NATO to discourage Putin from further adventurism. So far, though, NATO has turned out to be a blunt instrument: great for unifying its members to respond to a direct attack, but clumsy at projecting power beyond its boundaries. As Putin reorients away from the West and toward a Greater Russia, it remains to be seen whether soft-power deterrents matter to him at all.

Beyond these immediate measures, American experts are surprisingly short on specific suggestions about what more to do, perhaps because it’s been so long since they’ve had to contemplate a major rival engaging in such aggressive behavior. At the hawkish end, people like Davidson worry that Putin could repeat his expansion unless he sees a clear threat of military intervention to stop him. She thinks the United States and NATO ought to place advisers and hardware in the former Soviet republics, creating arrangements that signal Western military commitment. It’s a delicate dance, she said; the West has to be careful not to provoke further aggression while creating enough uncertainty to deter Putin.

Other observers in the field have made more modest economic proposals. Some have urged major investment in the economies of contested countries like Ukraine and Moldova, at the scale of the post-World War II Marshall Plan, and a long-term plan to wean Western Europe off Russian natural gas supplies, through which Moscow has gained enormous leverage, especially over Germany.

Davidson, however, believes that a deeper rethink is necessary, so that the United States won’t get tied up in knots or outflanked every time a powerful nation like Russia uses the stealthy¸ unpredictable tactics of non-state actors to pursue its goals. “We need to look at our definitions of military and law enforcement,” she said. “What’s a crime? What’s an aggressive act that requires a military response?”

McFaul, the former ambassador, said we’re in for a new age of confrontation because of Putin’s choices, and both the United States and Russia will find it more difficult to achieve their goals. In retrospect, he said, we’ll realize that the first decades after the Cold War offered a unique kind of safety, a de facto moratorium on Great Power hardball. That lull now seems to be over.

“It’s a tragic moment,” McFaul said.
- See more at: http://thanassiscambanis.com/2014/03/30/what-line-did-putin-cross-in-crimea/#sthash.KIZCzwzJ.dpuf
Ce linie a trecut Putin în Crimeea? Putin-crossing-the-line2
Putin-trecere-the-line

[Coloana Internaționaliștilor publicat în Idei The Boston Globe .]

Ce sa întâmplat în UCRAINA in ultima luna din stânga, chiar veterani politici observatorii dau din cap. Într-o zi, cetățenii au fost servind ceai la demonstranții eroice din Euromaidan Kiev, uniți împotriva unui presedinte autoritar. Aproape în următorii, anonime forțelor speciale luptatori din cagule roiau Crimeea, răspunde la nici un lider cunoscut sau de guvern, în timp ce Europa și Statele Unite ale Americii prins în zadar pentru modalități de a influența evenimentele.

În câteva zile, populația din Crimeea au votat într-un referendum organizat în grabă să se alăture Rusiei, și președintele Rusiei, Vladimir Putin, a semnat tratatul de anexare absorbție oficial peninsula strategic în națiunea lui.

Ca praful, liderii occidentali au trebuit să vină la termeni, nu numai cu o noua divizie de Ucraina, dar implicațiile sale neliniștitoare pentru modul în care funcționează lumea. O parte din șocul este în tactici lui Putin, care a amestecat o invazie de modă veche, cu un anumit grad de proces democratic în regiune, și adaugă o bucată de strategii moderne de insurgenți pentru o bună măsură.
Vladimir Putin la cosmodromul locul de lansare Plesetsk din nordul Rusiei.

Vladimir Putin la cosmodromul locul de lansare Plesetsk din nordul Rusiei. / PREZIDENȚIALE Serviciul de presă via Reuters

Dar când specialiștii de politici uităm la rezultatele, ei văd un punct de cotitură Starker. Anexarea lui Putin din Crimeea este o pauză în ordinea în care America și aliații săi au ajuns să se bazeze pe de la sfârșitul Războiului Rece, și anume, cea în care marile puteri interveni doar militar, atunci când acestea au un consens internațional de partea lor, sau în caz contrar, atunci când ei nu sunt de trecere linii roșii de putere rivale. Este un echilibru care a ținut lumea liberă de confruntari intre armatele sale cele mai puternice, și care au, în special, având în vedere Statele Unite, ca fiind cel mai puternic super-putere dintre toate, o gamă neobișnuit de largă de mișcare în lume. Așa cum se prăbușește, ea a lăsat factorii de decizie politica de codare pentru a afla atât cum să răspundă, și doar cât de departe un Rusia încurajat s-ar putea merge.

***

"Trăim într-o lume diferită decât am făcut-o mai puțin de o lună în urmă", a declarat Secretarul General al NATO, Anders Fogh Rasmussen în luna martie. Ucraina ar putea asista mai mult de lupta, el a avertizat, conflictul ar putea, de asemenea, extins în alte țări la frontierele Rusiei.

Până a început criza Crimeea, lumea în care a trăit în privit mai previzibil. Căderea Zidului Berlinului în urmă cu un sfert de secol a inaugurat într-o eră a curtoaziei internaționale și consolidarea instituțiilor nu a vazut de la nașterea a Organizației Națiunilor Unite în anul 1945. Acordurile comerciale internaționale proliferat la o viteză amețitoare. NATO sa extins rapid in inima fostului bloc sovietic, și avocați proiectat un Curtea Penală Internațională de a pedepsi crimele de război și constrânge interesele statului.

Numai puteri mici și mijlociu, cum ar fi Iran, Israel, și Coreea de Nord a ignorat convențiile de la vârsta de integrare și umanitarism și acțiunile lor au avut doar un impact regional, nu prezintă o amenințare strategică la nivel mondial. Cele mai mari puteri-Statele Unite, Rusia, China și-respectat ceea ce a fost de acord un domn internațional de a nu utiliza militar lor de câștiguri teritoriale directe sau să se amestece în sfera imediat un rival de influență. Puterile europene, prin intermediul NATO, a adoptat un Crouch defensivă. Statele Unite ale Americii, ca putere militară și economică dominantă a lumii, a menținut cel mai libertatea de a acționa în mod unilateral, atâta timp cât ferit de confruntare cu Rusia sau China. A căutat cu atenție sprijin internațional pentru intervențiile sale militare, chiar si construirea unei "coaliții de voință" pentru invazia din 2003 din Irak, care nu a fost aprobat de către Organizația Națiunilor Unite. Războiul din Irak ras la alte puteri mondiale care nu a putut îmbarcă pe aventurile militare proprii, dar, în ciuda iritarea Statelor Unite a provocat, factorii de decizie americani și strategi simțit încrezător că Statele Unite a fost ascultarea de normele nerostite.

În cazul în care comunitatea mondială a părut tulburat de modul de a răspunde la mișcările lui Putin în Crimeea în ultima lună, este că Rusia a întrerupt astfel brusc această narațiune. Folosind puterea militară incontestabil Rusiei, cu sprijinul de ucraineni într-un subset de această țară, a preluat o parte din teritoriu featuring portul valoros apă caldă de Sevastopol. Îndrăzneala de această mișcare lăsat în urmă sancțiunile și la alte evoluții delicate care au devenit stabilit ca tactici persuasive. Dintr-o dată, se pare, nu a existat nici o modalitate de a opri Rusia fără adevărat război.

Unii analiști spun că Putin pare să fi identificat o portiță în lumea post-Război Rece. Singura superputere, Statele Unite ale Americii, îi place să pună probleme în categorii îngrijite, separate, care pot fi tratate de către armata, printr-o acțiune de poliție sau de către instituții internaționale. Când o problemă estompează aceste limite-pirați în largul mării, cartelurile de droguri, cu submarine și militar de grad guvernele arme-occidentale, nu știu ce să fac. Astăzi, norme și instituții internaționale nu sunt configurate pentru a reacționa rapid la o mare putere legitimă dispuși să folosească forța pentru a obține ceea ce vrea.

"Avem aceste paradigme în Occident cu privire la ceea ce este considerat de poliție, și ceea ce este considerat război, și Putin este de echitatie până la mijlocul că,", a declarat Janine Davidson, un coleg senior la Consiliul pentru Relații Externe și fost ofițer de US Air Force, care consideră că acțiunile lui Putin va forța în Statele Unite pentru a actualiza modul de abordare a războiului modern. "Ceea ce face el este foarte inteligent."

Din motive evidente, o preocupare centrală este modul în care Putin ar putea face uz de playbook sale Crimeea viitor. El ar putea, de exemplu, încercați să inginer o provocare etnic, sau o revoltă spontană presupune, în oricare dintre republicile apropierea-rus, care amenință să se alieze prea strâns cu Occidentul. Mark Kramer, director de proiect Universitatea Harvard, pe de Studii Războiului Rece, a declarat că Putin a "enunțat propria doctrină de intervenție preventivă în numele comunităților ruse din țările vecine."

Au existat sesizări ale acestei abordări înainte. În 2008, infanteria rusa împins în două enclave în țara vecină, Georgia, citând revendicările-care mai târziu s-au dovedit false, care de mii de etnici ruși au fost masacrați. Rusia rutate rapid armata georgiană și a preluat Abhazia și Osetia de Sud. Astăzi, enclavele contestate plutesc într-un fel de zonă crepusculară, care le-au declarat independența, dar au fost recunoscute doar de către Moscova și câteva dintre aliații săi. Încă de atunci, politicienii georgieni au avertizat că Rusia s-ar putea face din nou acelasi lucru: Țara ar putea profita de un coridor de teren pentru Armenia, sau încearcă să absoarbă Republica Moldova, restul de Ucraina, sau chiar statele baltice, numai fostele republici sovietice la adere la NATO și Uniunea Europeană.

Alții văd îndemâna lui Putin ca fiind limitată la cel mai bun la locurile unde rezistenta militar semnificativ este absent și controlul de stat slabe. Chiar și în Ucraina, experții spun Rusia, Putin a părut mulțumit să exercite influență prin intermediul liderilor de prietenie până proteste fugit președintele ucrainean din oraș și a lăsat un vid de putere care alarmat Moscova. Graham, fostul oficial al administrației Bush, a declarat ca ar fi o lovitură de lungă pentru Putin să se mute militar său în alte republici: Există câteva locuri cu combinație Crimeea a unei enclave etnice rus, o lipsa de autoritate de stat, și risc redus de intervenție de Vest .

Vă faceți griji mai mare, desigur, este de cine altcineva ar putea dori să urmeze exemplul Rusiei. China este cel mai clar preocuparea, și din când în când a arătat semne de încercarea de a arunca greutatea sa în jurul regiunea sa, în special în zonele disputate din Marea Chinei de Sud. Dar până acum a fost barci de pescuit chineze și nave de pază de coastă hartuire pescarilor straini, cu marina chineză atent stau departe pentru a nu declanșa un răspuns militar. Pentru moment, cel puțin, Putin pare dispus să upend această ordine mondială delicat echilibru pe cont propriu.

***

Răspunsul comunității internaționale cu picior plat în Crimeea ridică întrebări clare: Ce ar trebui să Statele Unite și aliații săi fac în cazul în care acest tip de apuca teren se întâmplă din nou, și există o modalitate de a preveni astfel de mișcări în primul rând?

"Aceasta este o nouă perioadă care solicită o nouă strategie", a declarat Michael A. McFaul, care a demisionat din funcția de ambasador al SUA în Rusia, cu câteva săptămâni înainte de criză Crimeea. "Putin a făcut clar faptul că el nu-i pasă ce crede în Occident."

Până în prezent, răspunsul internațional a determinat o presiune de putere moale, care este proiectat pentru a avea un efect pe termen lung. Statele Unite și unele guverne europene au instaurat sancțiuni economice limitate vizează unele dintre consilierii apropiați ai lui Putin, Rusia și a fost dat afară din G-8. Se vorbește de revigorarea NATO pentru a descuraja Putin de la aventurismul mai departe. Până în prezent, însă, NATO sa dovedit a fi un instrument greu de cap: de mare pentru unificarea membrii săi pentru a răspunde la un atac direct, dar lipsit de tact la proiectare a puterii dincolo de granițele sale. Ca Putin reorientează departe de Occident și spre o mai mare Rusia, rămâne de văzut dacă descurajare soft-power contează pentru el la toate.

Dincolo de aceste măsuri imediate, experți americani sunt surprinzător de scurt pe sugestii specifice despre ce mai mult de a face, probabil pentru că a fost atât de mult timp, deoarece le-am avut de a contempla un rival important angajarea într-un astfel de comportament agresiv. La sfârșitul agresivă, oameni ca Davidson vă faceți griji că Putin ar putea repeta extinderea lui decât dacă el vede o amenințare clară de intervenție militară să-l oprească. Ea crede că Statele Unite și NATO ar trebui să pună consilieri și hardware-ul în fostele republici sovietice, creând un sistem care semnalează un angajament militar de Vest. Este un dans delicat, a spus ea, Occidentul trebuie să fie atenți să nu provoace agresiune continuare creând în același timp suficient de incertitudine pentru a descuraja Putin.

Alți observatori din domeniu au făcut propuneri economice mai modeste. Unii au cerut investiții majore în economiile țărilor în litigiu, cum ar fi Ucraina și Republica Moldova, la scara planului de după al doilea război mondial Marshall, și un plan pe termen lung pentru a dezvata Europa de Vest de pe livrările de gaze naturale rusești, prin care Moscova a câștigat efectul de levier enorm, mai ales peste Germania.

Davidson, cu toate acestea, consideră că o regândire profundă este necesar, astfel încât Statele Unite nu vor fi legat in noduri sau outflanked de fiecare dată când o națiune puternică ca Rusia foloseste invizibile tactica imprevizibile ¸ a actorilor non-statali să urmărească obiectivele sale. "Avem nevoie sa se uite la definițiile noastre de aplicare a legii și militare", a spus ea. "Ce este o crimă? Ce este un act agresiv, care necesită un răspuns militar? "

McFaul, fostul ambasador, a declarat că suntem într-o nouă eră de confruntare din cauza alegeri a lui Putin, și atât în ​​Statele Unite și Rusia vor fi mai greu pentru atingerea scopurilor lor. În retrospectivă, a spus el, vom realiza că în primele decenii de după Războiul Rece a oferit un fel unic de siguranță, un moratoriu de facto pe Marele dur de putere. Că acalmie acum pare a fi de peste.

"Este un moment tragic", a spus McFaul.
CHINEZ cumpar PECHINEZ
CHINEZ cumpar PECHINEZ

Mesaje : 257
Data de inscriere : 21/09/2012

Sus In jos

Ce linie a trecut Putin în Crimeea? Empty pe site

Mesaj Scris de CHINEZ cumpar PECHINEZ Dum Mar 30, 2014 7:12 pm

CHINEZ cumpar PECHINEZ
CHINEZ cumpar PECHINEZ

Mesaje : 257
Data de inscriere : 21/09/2012

Sus In jos

Sus


 
Permisiunile acestui forum:
Nu puteti raspunde la subiectele acestui forum